In Search of Shakespeare

In celebration of the Bard’s forthcoming 450th birthday, here is the BBC’s four part series on the lives and times of Will Shakespeare. It’s hosted by Michael Wood.

1. A Time of Revolution

2. The Lost Years

3. The Duty of Poets

4. For All Time

5. Bonus Episode

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Author: Idrees Ahmad

I am a Lecturer in Digital Journalism at the University of Stirling and a former research fellow at the University of Denver’s Center for Middle East Studies. I am the author of The Road to Iraq: The Making of a Neoconservative War (Edinburgh University Press, 2014). I write for The Observer, The Nation, The Daily Beast, Los Angeles Review of Books, The Atlantic, The New Republic, Al Jazeera, Dissent, The National, VICE News, Huffington Post, In These Times, Le Monde Diplomatique, Die Tageszeitung (TAZ), Adbusters, Guernica, London Review of Books (Blog), The New Arab, Bella Caledonia, Asia Times, IPS News, Medium, Political Insight, The Drouth, Canadian Dimension, Tanqeed, Variant, etc. I have appeared as an on-air analyst on Al Jazeera, the BBC, TRT World, RAI TV, Radio Open Source with Christopher Lydon, Alternative Radio with David Barsamian and several Pacifica Radio channels.

7 thoughts on “In Search of Shakespeare”

  1. Many thanks for posting this! I am in the midst of a ten week on-line MOOC class on “Shakespeare and His Times” at the University of Warwick, taught by Jonathan Bate. It is amazing how the Bard remains so relevant to the human experiences after more than four centuries.
    -Andy Berman

  2. The first two videos are tremendous and Michael Wood is one of my favourite presenters: but what has happened to parts 3 and 4? Please can we have them restored a.s.a.p.!

    I am, like Andy Berman, studying the OU FutureLearn MOOC ‘Shakespeare and his Times’ and this is an excellent adjunct to our course.

    Thank you
    Sue Rhodes

  3. Here am I, another MOOCer of the OU FutureLearn course “Shakespeare and His Times.” Yes, indeed, where are parts 3 and 4? Parts 1 and 2 offer a more in-depth look at Shakespeare and his times than the course, alone, can offer, so thanks for the addition and . . . please, sir, I want some more!

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